Roundtable Conference 'The medical community's role in stopping human rights abuses in health-care settings'

On November 5th 2010, IFHHRO organised a one-day Roundtable Conference on the role of health professionals in stopping human rights abuses in health-care settings. To this event leaders of the medical and nursing communities were invited, who explored and identified their position and role in this regard.

Discussions focused on three areas of human rights abuses; articulating and formulating the position of health professionals on these topics; and strategising for the future.

The three issues discussed were:

  • forced or coerced (non-consented) sterilisation;
  • denial of pain relief and the non-accessibility of palliative care;
  • so-called ‘treatment’ in detention centres for drug users, as punishment – often accompanied by forced labour, and without access to harm reduction services.

The Roundtable Conference was the first in a series of meetings organised by IFHHRO with the aim to engage health professionals in a global initiative to stop cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment in health-care settings.

Short Report (PDF)

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