UN Special Rapporteurs urge Israel to refrain from force-feeding

legalThe independent United Nations experts dealing with torture and the right to health urged the Israeli parliament yesterday not to authorize the force-feeding and medical treatment of prisoners on hunger strike against their will. The call by the Special Rapporteurs on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, Juan Méndez, and on the right to health, Anand Grover, comes as the Israeli parliament, the Knesset, delayed its second vote on a bill to amend the Prisons Act to allow force-feeding of prisoners.

Hundreds of Palestinian prisoners have been on hunger strike since 24 April 2014 to protest against the fact that many of them have been detained without charge or trial, and at the treatment they have been subjected to in Israeli prisons.

"It is not acceptable to force-feed or use threats of force-feeding or other physical or psychological coercion against individuals who have opted for the extreme recourse of a hunger strike to protest against their detention without charge and conditions of detention and treatment," Mr. Méndez said in a news release. "The desire of the inmates not to eat must be respected for as long as it is clear that they are making that choice voluntarily. Even if it is intended for the benefit of the detainees, feeding induced by threats, coercion, force or use of physical restraints are tantamount to cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment," he added.

The news release noted that the proposed amendments would also oblige doctors who refuse to carry out forced feeding to identify a colleague who would agree to perform such measures. This would place an obligation on doctors to act contrary to their professional code of ethics. "Healthcare personnel may not apply undue pressure on individuals who have decided to go on hunger strike," said Mr. Grover. "Prisoners' rights to control their health, body, and be free from interference such as non-consensual medical treatment are fundamental elements of the right to health that must be respected and protected."

The experts urged the Israeli Government to respect and guarantee the rights to life, health and personal integrity of all detainees and refrain from force-feeding and other coercive measures. They stressed that the authorities have a duty to look for solutions to the crisis generating the hunger strike, including good faith dialogue with the inmates on their detention, its conditions and treatment. In addition, they echoed the repeated call of UN bodies and the international human rights community to end the practice of prolonged administrative detention.

Copied from: United Nations News Centre 

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