New visual teaching tool on health and human rights

educationThe Health Sciences Faculty of the University of Cape Town (South Africa) developed a visual teaching tool on health and human rights. This Human Rights Key serves as an infographic to guide students to connect their classroom learning with the reality of local, regional and international health and human rights issues.

The framework enables students in the health professions to recognise relationships and connections between human rights, their own personal realities, legal mechanisms and their future clinical practice. 

key

The objectives of the Key are:

  • to assist students in understanding human rights to illuminate the links between human rights and health
  • to promote student awareness of different perspectives with relevance for practice
  • to encourage students in becoming socially accountable health professionals
  • to enable students to be advocates of change for advancing human rights by supporting their patients to
    • take control in turning their own Keys
    • promote autonomy in owning their Keys
    • develop their own agency

The Human Rights Key draws from IFHHRO's online training manual, as well as other sources.

Access the Human Rights Key

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