DRC: Health and human rights activist under threat

legalSAVE CONGO is an IFHHRO member based in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Its Executive Director, Mr. Kitwe Mulunda Guy, has been receiving  anonymous phone calls since two weeks, demanding him to immediately stop providing legal aid for victims of torture.

If he does not comply, "he will be responsible for any misfortune that could happen to him". The threats may be connected to an investigation by the Garrison Military Court in Lubumbashi, which has invited SAVE CONGO to appear before and inform the court about the torture of five people who were treated by the organisation in January 2011. During the physical examination of these clients (workers/drivers of a mining company who have been accused of stealing copper) the medics found that they had been tortured, allegedly by special police forces. One of the accused, a high-ranking police commissioner, on 16 June asked Mr. Guy to come to his office, which he refused.

IFHHRO is concerned about Kitwe Mulunda Guy's safety and will support him and his organisation as much as possible.

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